Pomegranate juice may slow prostate cancer progression

According to a study presented at the American Urological Association’s annual meeting in 2009, drinking 8 ounces of pomegranate juice a day may slow the progression of prostate cancer.

The study included 48 men who had a rising prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level following radiation therapy or surgery to treat localized prostate cancer. At the start of the study in 2003, the men had PSA levels greater than 0.2 and less than 5.0 ng/ml, and an average PSA doubling time of 15.4 months. (PSA doubling time is a measure of cancer’s activity, with shorter times indicating more aggressive behavior.) In 2006, researchers reported that the men who drank 8 ounces of pomegranate juice daily had slower PSA doubling times.

Since then, researchers continued to follow the participants, 15 of whom stuck with the study for as long as 64 months. They found that the PSA doubling times of the men who kept drinking pomegranate juice were about four times longer than the PSA doubling times at the study’s start — and longer than the PSA doubling times of the men who stopped drinking the juice.

For those who want to try pomegranate juice, one note of caution: it’s high in calories. An 8-ounce glass of POM Wonderful, the juice used in the study, contains 160 calories, 50 calories more than a typical glass of orange juice.

SOURCE: Pantuck AJ, Zomorodian N, Rettig M, et al. Long-term Follow-Up of Phase 2 Study of Pomegranate Juice for Men with Prostate Cancer Shows Durable Prolongation of PSA Doubling Time. Journal of Urology 2009;181(4 Suppl): abstract 826.

Originally published July 1, 2009; Last reviewed April 11, 2011

Comments
8
Ivani Norman

My husband was recently diagnosed with prostate CA recoring after cryo about 8 years ago. His most recent PSA was 12.9. Now, his L groin lymph node was biopsed. The result was lymphoma and negative for carcinoma. Would you recommend Proton x regular radion Therapy? What is your taken on these treatments? Should we try something else?

Dr Brian K. Bailey

Due to symptoms seen as presented above in the area of chief complaint an ultrasound study was performed. Area/s scanned: The area of chief complaint was scanned using an 15 MHz probe. Views were taken in both the longitudinal and transverse planes. The plantar aspect of the __ foot was scanned concentrating on the plantar fascia. A series of sagittal and transverse images were obtained. Report: Ultrasound examination reveals inflammation of the proximal plantar fascia. This was easily seen in both the longitudinal and transverse scans. A linear hypoechoic band of tissue with its origin at the medial plantar tuberosity of the calcaneus is noted. This same area extends distal to just to the end of the calcaneus on the plantar aspect. This area of inflammation measures __ mm at its greatest thickness (normal thickness is approximately 3mm). There is no indication of a tear or rupture of the plantar fascia. An Ultrasound guided injection war performed into the hypoechoic area utilizing

Roy

Pomegranate juice generally has a remarkable amount of sugar – something you want to avoid if you have cancer. Pomegranate supplements would seem to be a better choice.

Stan

Apparently, no one is monitoring this web blog or answering questions. My own research suggests that there is much more evidence that Vitamin D3 slows the progression of prostate cancer. Every male should be taking at least 4000 IU daily. Ignore the government nonsensical recommendation to take only 400 IU. (Just for reference…a day in the sun is equivalent to 10,000 to 20,000 IU of D3.)
I have prostate cancer, am in Active Surveillance, and take 15,000 IU daily. (Take it with a meal…it needs fat) Perhaps not coincidentally, my PSA has gove from 6.3 at time of biopsy to 5.0 to 4.2 to 3.8 over the past 20 months.

Ed

Stan: I understand there’s quite a range between the strength/concentration among brands of D3 supplements. How did you settle on the one you are taking? Your PSA numbers are quite a significant drop. Have you located any other studies of D3’s effectiveness?

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